Course Spotlight

There's more than one way to see the world.

Strengthen your fall schedule

This fall, HLS is offering hundreds of courses that strengthen your global knowledge and regional expertise while helping you meet degree requirements

We've highlighted a few here, but check out iGPS for our complete list of learning opportunities in International Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, International Law & Institutes, Central Eurasian Studies, Middle Eastern Languages & Cultures, and African, European, Latin American, Russian, and Southeast Asian studies.

This page highlights courses in three academic sessions:

  • August Intersession (Aug. 10–19)
  • Fall Small Session (Nov. 30–Dec. 14)
  • Fall Semester (Aug. 24–Dec. 20)

August Intersession (Aug. 10–19)

INTL-I 212, "Black Lives Matter as a Global Movement"

Class #: 37735

Meeting Time: Mon/Tues/Wed/Thurs/Fri, 2:00pm-3:45pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Hamid Ekbia

Analyze Black Lives Matter as a global human rights movement focused on race and the intersections of gender, class, and colonialism. Students will look at BLM, its US roots, and history through a global lens and perspective, while exploring how countries around the world are viewing and joining this movement. The course will also touch on the immigrant/refugee/revolutionary perspective and feature a number of guest lecturers from Indiana University and of national renown.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

CEUS-R 299, "Great Firewalls of China"

Class #: 37365

Meeting Time: Mon/Tues/Wed/Thurs/Fri, 1:45pm-3:25pm

Location: HY (On Campus & Online)

Instructor: Michael Brose

China views the internet as a potent threat to its national security. Borrowing from the traditional model of wall building, China is working hard to construct a "Great Firewall" to address this perceived threat. But China's new Firewall also has offensive as well as defensive purposes, similar also to premodern physical walls along China's northern border. We will learn about both sides of China's Great Firewall in this class, along with some basic knowledge of China's history, government and society. This class will also introduce you to many important resources and tools you will need to be a successful student at IU.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

Fall Small Session (Nov. 30–Dec. 14)

INTL-I 212, "Black Lives Matter as a Global Movement"

Class #: 37736

Meeting Time: Mon/Tues/Wed/Thurs/Fri, 3:15pm-4:30pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Hamid Ekbia

Analyze Black Lives Matter as a global human rights movement focused on race and the intersections of gender, class, and colonialism. Students will look at BLM, its US roots, and history through a global lens and perspective, while exploring how countries around the world are viewing and joining this movement. The course will also touch on the immigrant/refugee/revolutionary perspective and feature a number of guest lecturers from Indiana University and of national renown.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

SGIS-S 200, "Women in International Affairs"

Class #: 37369

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 10:00am-10:50am

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Ashlynne Bender

Evaluate the barriers and obstacles facing women in international affairs, both from the perspective of women’s absence in careers and leadership roles in the field, as well as the exclusion of women and “women’s issues” in policymaking. Students will hear from a range of guest speakers who will discuss how they have navigated barriers and pitfalls, and provide advice on career and leadership development.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

SGIS-S 300, "Global Careers Bootcamp"

Class #: 37362

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 4:55pm-6:10pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Ashlynne Bender

It’s never too early to start preparing for your post-graduate career. Students will learn how to navigate the job-seeking process, engage in skill-building workshops and networking opportunities with global leaders, and better understand how to turn their degree and academic interests into global careers.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

SGIS-S 300, "Global Issues Affecting Local Communities"

Class #: 37368

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 1:10pm-2:25pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Ashlynne Bender

Students will select one of a variety of global issues affecting today’s world and complete research to create tangible resources that can be used in their local communities.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

SGIS-S 300, "Global Service: Your Next Steps"

Class #: 37363

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 10:00am-10:50am

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Teresa Nichols

Learn about service careers and volunteer opportunities that address global issues on local, national, and international levels and then develop an action plan to increase engagement in your own community or globally.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

SGIS-S 300, "Op-Ed Writing for Global Policy Debates"

Class #: 37389

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 1:10pm-2:25pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Tod Lindberg

Looking for a way to improve your professional and analytical writing skills? This course will train students to write professional quality op-eds, which are critical components of policy debates and global careers. You will learn to write in your own voice and you will learn to write on behalf of senior leaders. Course sessions will focus on key components and the research and writing skills needed to effectively influence policy debates through op-eds. The format of this course will be similar to a small seminar, but with more focus on individualized instruction and feedback. This is a 2 unit course, but students may also take this course for 1 unit, with a reduced workload.

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

SGIS-S 300, "Visualization: Basic Tools and Techniques"

Class #: 37371

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 3:15pm-4:00pm

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Mindy King

It’s not enough to understand data. You also need to know how to interpret and explain it to others. This course provides foundational skills in data visualization that can be applied across a wide range of disciplines and audiences. Students will develop the fundamental knowledge and skills to communicate trends in quantitative and qualitative data and also learn how to create and edit a variety of charts and present them in dashboards and presentations. All data analysis and assignments will be completed using commonly available software (e.g., Microsoft Excel and PowerPoint).

View course in IGPSView more SGIS courses

INTL-I 499/I-545 "The History and Development of International Criminal Tribunals"

Class #: 37372/37373

Meeting Time: Mon/Tues/Wed/Thurs/Fri, 9:00am-9:50am

Location: Hybrid Distance

Instructor: Tanya Pettay

Get an introduction into the history and development of International Criminal Tribunals, including exploring why and how they were established, as well as major cases, achievements, and challenges. This course will include a variety of guest speakers practicing in the field.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

AFRI-X 391/L-506 "Introduction to Arabic Language and Culture"

Class #: 37398/37400

Meeting Time: Arranged

Location: Distance Other

Instructor: Iman Alramadan & Attia Youseif

Students will learn the basics of Arabic conversation, including greetings, common expressions, making self-introductions, and talking about hobbies. They will also learn the basics of Arab culture including religion, history, social customs, popular music and cinema, sports and cuisine.

View course in IGPSView more AFRI courses

AFRI-X 390/A-500 "Youtubing the Middle East: Learning, Reflecting and Enjoying"

Class #: 37406/37407

Meeting Time: Arranged

Location: 100% Online

Instructor: Asaad Alsaleh

Youtube is now a phenomenally important platform for young Arabs, who are able to use it to express themselves freely on political, cultural and personal topics of all kinds without the interference of government censors, who are unfortunately ubiquitous in the Arab World. Through this class, students will meet poets, revolutionaries and radicals, stand-up comedians, chefs, and ordinary people; they will have a chance to see the Middle East as the Middle East sees itself.

View course in IGPSView more AFRI courses

Fall Semester (Aug. 24–Dec. 20)

The following courses take place during the Fall 2020 semester.

African Studies

AFRI-A 100, "Where there are no Jungles"

Class #: 31618

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 11:15am-12:30pm

Location: GA 1106

Instructor: Tavy Aherne

Wondering what ‘African Studies’ encompasses? Want a basic understanding of Africa in global perspective? From a variety of disciplinary approaches? Just want to learn something new? This course is for you? We will begin by critically assessing the framing of Africa in the U.S., problematizing modes of knowledge production on Africa (ex: through social media, film, news, academic writing). We’ll look at the diverse, rich heritage and contemporary reality of peoples of the African continent from the perspectives of African scholars, artists, writers, and everyday citizens.

View course in IGPSView more AFRI courses

International Political Economy of China

Once an exporter of communist revolution and socialist assistance during the Mao era, China is now a leading global power in trade, investment, and aid. In this process of transformation, China is blurring boundaries between the state and business, challenging conventional conceptions of development, and transforming international economic institutions. Topics covered include China’s overseas aid, trade, investment, economic statecraft, state-owned enterprises, participation in international institutions like the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, and campaigns like the Belt and Road Initiative and Made in China 2025.

Instructor: Wendy Leutert

EALC-E 350, Class #: 35060

View course in IGPS

Central Eurasian Studies

CEUS-R 290, "Introduction to Central Asia, Mongolia, and Tibet"

Class #: 31605

Meeting Time: Asynchronous instruction

Location: 100% Online

Instructor: Kenneth Linden

Central Asia, Mongolia, and Tibet have a unique legacy in the world today: nomads, Silk Road, Islam, Buddhism, Russo-Chinese rivalry, Communism, and resistance. This course will provide a broad overview of trends and issues in this crossroads of cultures and civilizations through a combination of lectures, discussions, and guest presentations.

View course in IGPSView more CEUS courses

CEUS-R 330, "Politics in Modern Xinjiang"

Class #: 31582

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 2:30pm-3:45pm

Location: EP 256

Instructor: Gardner Bovingdon

Exploration of Xinjiang's politics from 1900 to the present, focusing on Islam, identity politics, immigration, language battles, cultural resistance, the Production and Construction Corps, political economy, and oil.

View course in IGPSView more CEUS courses

CEUS-R 345, "20th Century War & Peace "

Class #: 31589

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 2:30pm-3:45pm

Location: GA 0009

Instructor: Laszlo Borhi

The course will compare democratic political systems to autocratic/dictatorial ones and explore the different ways in which each political system affects the lives of individuals. The course will explore how democracies are better equipped to support economic and cultural progress and to fulfill the dreams of individual people than dictatorships founded on messianistic ideologies. The empirical basis of comparison will be the comparison of East European left and right wing dictatorial systems with democracies. The course will explore the process of democracy building and its pitfalls.

View course in IGPSView more CEUS courses

Introduction to Central Asia, Mongolia, and Tibet

Central Asia, Mongolia, and Tibet have a unique legacy in the world today: nomads, Silk Road, Islam, Buddhism, Russo-Chinese rivalry, Communism, and resistance. This course will provide a broad overview of trends and issues in this crossroads of cultures and civilizations through a combination of lectures, discussions, and guest presentations.

Instructor: Kenneth Linden

CEUS-R 290, Class #: 31605

View course in IGPS

East Asian Languages and Cultures

EALC-E 100, "East Asia: An Introduction"

Class #: 12046

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 1:25pm-2:15pm

Location: FA 015

Instructor: Michael Brose

What is "East Asia"? Most people know that China, Japan and Korea are part of "East Asia," but what about Vietnam? In fact, all four of these countries and cultures have many things in common, and their commonalities define the large region we call "East Asia." At the same time, each of these states and societies have their own unique histories and cultures. This course will look at each of those states and cultures individually and how they have been connected. Our study starts just as the modern era is emerging (middle of the 18th century) and takes the story through the present. We will look at culture, politics, religion, the environment, war, and foreign relations. By the end of the semester you will have a very good grasp of the history and current conditions of China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam and how they define one of the most important regions of the globe today.

View course in IGPSView more EALC courses

EALC-E 115, "Literatures of Love From Early Times to the Present"

Class #: 32296

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 9:30am-10:45am

Location: GA 1100

Instructor: Susan Hwang

What do we talk about when we talk about love? Is it self-love, self-interest, or altruistic emotion? And what's sex got to do with love? This introductory survey course examines love in East Asian literature from earliest legends to 21st-century novels. We will explore diverse expressions of love--sexual, romantic, narcissistic, erotic, filial, nationalistic, and so on--in various forms of literary works (legends, short fiction, poems, drama), films, and songs. How was the language of love used to explore questions of gender, class, and/or national identity? Students will learn about the historical specificities as well as the culturally interconnected experiences of love in East Asia. All readings will be in English translation.

View course in IGPSView more EALC courses

EALC-E 350, "International Political Economy of China"

Class #: 35060

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 1:00pm-2:15pm

Location: GA 1106

Instructor: Wendy Leutert

This course investigates the international political economy of the People’s Republic of China. Once an exporter of communist revolution and socialist assistance during the Mao era, China is now a leading global power in trade, investment, and aid. In this process of transformation, China is blurring boundaries between the state and business, challenging conventional conceptions of development, and transforming international economic institutions. Topics covered include China’s overseas aid, trade, investment, economic statecraft, state-owned enterprises, participation in international institutions like the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, and campaigns like the Belt and Road Initiative and Made in China 2025. We will discuss the economics, politics, and ideas shaping China’s policy decisions, and critically consider their implications from the perspectives of domestic and international actors.

View course in IGPSView more EALC courses

EALC-E 350, "Japanese Foreign Policy"

Class #: 35345

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 4:00pm-5:15pm

Location: TBD

Instructor: Adam Liff

This course introduces students to the post-1945 foreign relations of Japan. Over the past 150 years, Japan has repeatedly reinvented itself. After 1868, Japanese leaders responded to the threat of Western imperialism with a development trajectory that left the Western world in awe, but which ultimately proved catastrophic. After 1945, Japan transformed itself again, rising from the ashes of World War II to develop into an economic superpower whose economy became larger than that of the Soviet Union, but whose security policy trajectory was categorically opposite that of its pre-1945 self. Under Japan's current leadership, many argue that Japan today is on the verge of another radical change in its foreign policy trajectory. But is it? This course will focus on the development of Japan's foreign relations since World War II, and critically examine how Tokyo is seeking to adjust its policies in face of the complicated challenges of the 21st century from the rise of China and North Korea's nuclear program to concerns about climate change, free trade, pandemics, relative American decline, and the advent of the Trump administration. Through the prism of Japanese foreign policy, students will develop a better understanding of Japanese politics and the dynamics of international relations in East Asia, as well as of U.S. strategy towards this extremely dynamic region. With many arguing today that Japan is on the verge of another major transformation, we will end the semester with debates about the future of Japan's relations with China and the United States, as well as the future of Japan itself. Throughout the semester, we will have ample opportunity to discuss and debate various issues affecting Japanese foreign policy, as well as current events making global headlines. Enrolled students will also have special opportunities to engage leading experts on Japan visiting IU through speaker series organized by the professor.

View course in IGPSView more EALC courses

EALC-E 352, "China Inc., Communism-Capitalism"

Class #: 32305

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 4:00pm-5:15pm

Location: ED 2101

Instructor: Wendy Leutert

This course examines China’s economic development model in historical and comparative perspective, from 1949 to the present. Mao Zedong led the world’s most populous country in a revolutionary attempt to transform China into a communist state. After the planned economy failed to deliver its promise of development, reforms to create “capitalism with Chinese characteristics” have yielded decades of rapid economic growth without a full transition to a market economy. How did the socialist system function and evolve in China? What has the state’s role in the Chinese economy been—and what should it be? We will discuss topics including the planned economy, economic reform, state-owned enterprises, migration and inequality, and digital capitalism. Students will gain a critical understanding of China’s economic changes and assess their consequences for domestic and international actors.

View course in IGPSView more EALC courses

Japanese Foreign Policy

Under Japan's current leadership, many argue that Japan today is on the verge of another radical change in its foreign policy trajectory. But is it? This course will focus on the development of Japan's foreign relations since World War II, and critically examine how Tokyo is seeking to adjust its policies in face of the complicated challenges of the 21st century from the rise of China and North Korea's nuclear program to concerns about climate change, free trade, pandemics, relative American decline, and the advent of the Trump administration.

Instructor: Adam Liff

EALC-E 350, Class #: 35345

View course in IGPS

International Studies

INTL-I 100, "Introduction to International Studies"

Class #: 6340

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 2:30pm-3:20pm

Location: WH 101

Instructor: Nick Cullather

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

INTL-I 100, "Introduction to International Studies"

Class #: 9293

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 10:10am-11:00am

Location: GA 0001

Instructor: Gardner Bovingdon

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

INTL-I 103, "Global Business: Politics, Policy, and Practice"

Class #: 34870

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 1:00pm-2:15pm

Location: GA 1100

Instructor: Sarah Bauerle Danzman

What does it mean to be a global corporation in the 21st Century? What kinds of dilemmas do business leaders face when operating in different counties with varying political, cultural, technological, and environmental landscapes? How can communities harness the positive aspects of global business while managing the social, environmental, and security risks they generate? Should consumers and voters hold global businesses to high social and environmental standards, and if so, how? In this course, you will learn how to analyze the opportunities and challenges multinational enterprises generate using real cases from global companies including: Exxon Mobile, Nike, Patagonia, Toms Shoes, Starbucks, Apple, Facebook, and even Grindr (who knew a dating app would generate national security concerns?!). Individually and with teams, you will use political, economic, historical, and cultural knowledge to critically analyze, debate, and solve real-world problems that business, political, and community leaders face. Through studying and debating these cases, you will develop a set of valuable risk analysis, ethical reasoning skills, and cultural competencies necessary to becoming a leader in corporate, community, and political environments as well as learn the basics of writing a policy memo.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

INTL-I 206, "Peace and Conflict"

Class #: 10489

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 10:10am-11:00am

Location: GA 0001

Instructor: Hussein Banai

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race, and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

INTL-I 305, "Global Fake News"

Class #: 12824

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 4:00pm-6:30pm

Location: GA 0003

Instructor: Noah Arjomand

What makes news real or fake? Who creates fake news, why, and how does it spread? And how do answers to those questions vary over time and around the world? This course will take a global perspective to understanding truth and falsehood in the media and their effects on societies and on international relations. From the philosophy of bullshit to the history of the yellow press to analyses of online networks, we will bring together a wide range of sources and disciplines to consider fake news as a political tool, as a side-effect of the social organization of news making, as a product being sold to consumers, and as either a threat to or an inescapable aspect of democracy.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

INTL-I 310, "Challenges of Modern Conflict"

Class #: 36720

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 11:15am-12:30pm

Location: WH 002

Instructor: Andrew Bell

How will global security challenges shape international politics in the 21st century? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about the key issues of security and conflict in the modern era. In this course, we will examine issues such as civil war, counterinsurgency, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, drones, and technology in warfare. We will approach these issues from empirical, theoretical, and policy perspectives to understand how such issues will influence international politics today and in the decades to come. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge in order to assess global policies to promote international stability and human security. Students pursuing careers in human rights, security, diplomacy, intelligence, law, or international policy will find this course useful.

View course in IGPSView more INTL courses

Global Fake News

What makes news real or fake? Who creates fake news, why, and how does it spread? And how do answers to those questions vary over time and around the world? This course will take a global perspective to understanding truth and falsehood in the media and their effects on societies and on international relations.

Instructor: Noah Arjomand

INTL-I 305, Class #: 12824

View course in IGPS

Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures

NELC-N 239, "US Foreign Policy and the Muslim World"

Class #: 31778

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 4:00pm-5:15pm

Location: GA 1112

Instructor: Abdulkader Sinno

Introduces salient policy debates that shape contemporary American foreign policy toward the Middle East and the Muslim world. Explores foreign policy decision making and international relations theory. Addresses major policy questions, including US reactions to the crisis in Syria and the Arab Spring.

View course in IGPSView more NELC courses

NELC-N 265, "Introduction to Islamic Civilization"

Class #: 31559

Meeting Time: Tues/Thurs, 11:15am-12:15pm

Location: AD A152

Instructor: Joshua Georgy

Survey of Islamic civilization in the classical period. Topics include the life of Muhammad, Koranic and other teachings of Islam, conquests and caliphates, early successor states, law, sects, theology, philosophy, and the relationship between state and religion.

View course in IGPSView more NELC courses

NELC-N 304, "Isis and Terrorism"

Class #: 31850

Meeting Time: Mon/Wed, 11:15am-12:30pm

Location: BH 318

Instructor: Asaad Alsaleh

This course will examine how ISIS emerged in these neighboring countries of the Middle East. It will help students to understand ISIS within the context of the current events in Syria, Iraq, and other involved countries. The course will also answer such question as: How did ISIS emerge? What have been the factors that led to the survival and strength of terrorism in Iraq and Syria? How does ISIS appeal to those who join it? What is the Ideology of ISIS? Additionally, students will study terrorism, its definition/s, historical development, and some theories about its psychological and ideological motivations.

View course in IGPSView more NELC courses

Challenges of Modern Conflict

How will global security challenges shape international politics in the 21st century? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about the key issues of security and conflict in the modern era. In this course, we will examine issues such as civil war, counterinsurgency, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, drones, and technology in warfare.

Instructor: Andrew Bell

INTL-I 310, Class #: 36720

View course in IGPS